It’s been seven days now since my return from my third trip to Brazil.  It was another fantastic trip with Nomadic Waters.  My past two trips we fished the Utama region and to see something new we went to the Rio Negro river this year.  The Rio is a intimidating river, largest tributary to the Amazon river and is the 5th largest river in the world.  Its 13 miles wide in its widest part.  The river is nothing but islands, braids, and channels.  How in the world the guides knew their way around was beyond me.  I could do it maybe with a GPS but their knowledge of the river was incredible.  The river was a bit high at the start of our week but each day the water dropped.  Everyday the river dropped the more big fish my anglers were catching.  So you understand, peacock bass push way up in the flooded timber if the water is up.  When the water starts getting skinny for them they come to the bank edge where it is much easier for the anglers to get a fly to them.  Make sure if you head to the Amazon to fish for peacock bass you go during the dry season.  If the water is really high its going to be tough.  Always a good idea to go with a experienced outfitter like Nomadic Waters.  Peacock Bass are interesting fish, they sleep at night so in the day time they are active.  Lower light generally seems best but I have got a few double digit fish in the middle of the day.  The Rio had the same fish as the Utama but generally the Rio has more chances at bigger fish.  I actually preferred the Utama over the Rio so I will be returning there in 2020.  Speaking of returning, I have already filled my October 2020 trip with 12 anglers.  It shows Nomadic Waters does a great job when 6 anglers in my group are returning for their second, third, or fourth time.  If going off the grid in comfort after one of baddest fish on the planet interest you, feel free to contact me.  2020 trip is full but there is always a chance of a cancellation.  I’d be happy to keep a waiting list.  I will be returning every year as long as I can!    https://www.nomadicwaters.com